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An invisible root

Tobias Jones writes provocatively in the Guardian of secularists and Christians in Britain.

As Nick Spencer writes in Doing God, 'the secular was Christianity's gift to the world, denoting a public space in which authorities should be respected, but could be legitimately challenged and could never accord to themselves absolute or ultimate significance'. Christianity, far from creating an absolutist state, initiated dissent from state absolutism.

And so for centuries a combination of British agnosticism and pragmatism meant that believers were judged not by the causes of their belief, but by its consequences. Everyone could taste the fruits, even those who couldn't believe in a sustaining, invisible root.

There is also a long, smouldering thread of responses.

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