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BRITS WEEK IN REVIEW

A host of controversial people and ideas clashed last week. Lord Monckton challenged Al Gore to debate human-caused global warming, while Professor Stott of London University showed New Yorkers that global warming is almost certainly the result of increased activity on the Sun. (Al Gore has the facts exactly backwards: carbon increases follow, they do not precede, warming.)

Meanwhile Chancellor Brown is still trying to run the British economy, although ideas developed by the British over the last five hundred years show this is a sure way to run an economy into the ground. Taxpayers are wroth with his stealthy tax increases. Voters are increasingly concerned that despite repeated polls showing they want Britain to leave the EU, their elected leaders fail to respond.

We discuss why cricket is under attack, and why cricket will survive murder most foul. We note Peregrine Worsthorne’s column on the dearth of leaders in Parliament, and contrast them with a great British leader, whose genius was for a long time unappreciated. And we write about the observations of a British anthropologist (and the reply of a reader) on Muslim assimilation in Britain.

More positively we note the contributions of Sir Arthur Marshall in a century of wings; the courage of the women of Motor Ambulance Convoy 502 (and their lyrical abilities); the beauty of Housman’s ode to spring; the inspiration of Lord Wedderburn’s slave ancestor; the British-French partnership in magnolias; the exemplary gallantry of Pte Norris and Major Chesarek; the bravery of a man whose willingness to face death at the stake contributed to the creation of freedom of conscience in Britain and America; and, in the fourth in a series, the fellowship to abolish slavery which ended with Britain abolishing the slave trade two hundred years ago today.

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See you on Monday.

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