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Building the Transatlantic Bridge

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The Welland Canal and the St Lawrence Seaway
The St Lawrence River flows 750 miles northeast from Lake Ontario along the Canada–US border and through southern Quebec to the Gulf of St. Lawrence. In the 19th century, Britain built canals to expedite shipping. In the 20th century Canada and the US built a system of canals on the river - the St Lawrence Seaway - so that ocean-going vessels could travel between the Atlantic and the Great Lakes. As a result Canada trades with the US, Britain and Europe. Image: Inland Waterways International

Global Vision has just published Building the Transatlantic Bridge by Brent Cameron, who argues that the Commonwealth countries, and in particular Canada and the United Kingdom have a natural trade advantage which should be exploited in the age of globalization -

In terms of trade between Canada and the UK, the common use of English nullifies the impact of the ocean that separates us. The use of a common language and legal structures has more of an impact on our bilateral trade than the adoption of a single currency has had for the eurozone. Canada’s exports to the UK in 2004 were 25 percent higher than the year before, yet no free trade treaty exists between us.

Interesting. Extremely interesting. Free trade exists without a free trade treaty. Tell that to the EU.

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