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Robin Hood on Obama's tax plan

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When four men seized the miller's sack of meal, the miller shouted, "Do me no harm. . .ye are upon Robin Hood's ground, and should he find you seeking to rob an honest craftsman, he will clip your ears to your heads and scourge you even to the walls of Nottingham."

The New York Post reported on a recent exchange between Senator Obama and a working man -

"Your new tax plan is going to tax me more, isn't it?" the blue-collar worker asked.

After Obama responded that it would, Wurzelbacher continued: "I've worked hard . . . I work 10 to 12 hours a day and I'm buying this company and I'm going to continue working that way. I'm getting taxed more and more while fulfilling the American Dream."

The Senator explained that he wants to "spread the wealth around". It sounds lovely, doesn't it, even if it means that hard-working plumbers, small shop owners, and risk-taking entrepreneurs are going to be taxed more heavily? The New York Post called it a warning shot from Robin Hood, but mistakenly identified Robin -

1) Robin Hood did not steal from entrepreneurs. He stole from the Sheriff of Nottingham and from rich clergy - the tax men - to return their money to those who had earned it. His target was the rapacious state.

2) Robin Hood did not rob plumbers.

Reasons to fear Obama's idea are described today by Scott Johnson in Powerline. Key line - "Given that one of the causes of the American Revolution was a tax, the founders understood very well that taxation could become a way for one group to prey on another."

Indeed, the founders had all been British subjects, and like Robin Hood they understood the principle of predatory taxation very well. It's a smaller step than we may think from the government deciding that entrepreneurs making more than $250,000 should be taxed to the gills to deciding that teachers on a retirement pension are receiving too much pay. It happened in the USSR. It happened in Prague.

And when the entrepreneur decides the ordeal isn't worth it - why work harder, why build a company and why employ any more workers - how will government handle the resulting unemployment? By taxing people even more?

Yes.

But remember this. Excessive taxation was the cause of every successful British revolt.

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