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We are working on a book called Sharing the Inheritance for you.

The Inheritance is a valuable thing to have.

Oddly, since inheritances don’t usually work this way, the more people share it, the bigger and richer the Inheritance becomes.

We have to admit that this aspect of the Inheritance surprised us at first, but it soon made sense to us and we think it will make sense to you.

Everyone can understand the Inheritance, but there are two challenges to acquiring and benefiting from it.

The first challenge is that it is not sufficient to have a mind capable of understanding the Inheritance; each person has to apply his or her mind. Even people with great brains can have trouble doing this.

You might think that an intelligent person would instantly grasp the Inheritance, but some people are prey to aberrations because their wishful thinking is more important to them than actual facts. In contrast, people with no special talent, except the inestimable one of seeing clearly, make remarkable progress in recognizing the Inheritance and using it. Still, even they may lose the Inheritance if too few people around them understand it.

The second challenge to acquiring and benefiting from the Inheritance is that at times various bequests have been buried or deliberately destroyed. Greedy and corrupt persons try to steal the Inheritance. Fanatics try to smash it, and life without the Inheritance becomes a dreary catalogue of evils.

Is it possible that the Inheritance is not what we say it is and that we are mistaking base metal and glass for gold and diamonds? Yes.

We will describe what we know of the Inheritance. We will focus – though not exclusively - on the bequests created by Brits because they are the bequests we know about. We will do this swiftly because your time is valuable.

Can this book describe your whole Inheritance? No.

We have identified forty bequests and their brilliant and often forgotten creators. Some of the bequests are visible, and some are invisible. The latter are ideas that shape the visible world.

You will decide what to do with them.

This book has absorbed our time, and made our posts a little feeble at times. Hopefully not too feeble. We'll keep you posted as we prepare the book for publication.

In the meantime, since writers and readers need to eat, I recommend Jamie Oliver's recipe for baked sea bass which I cooked for friends last night, substituting wild halibut for the bass. Here it is, from his book The Naked Chef -

Serves 4
4 fillets of sea bass (or halibut)
1/2 clove of garlic
salt and freshly ground pepper
1 handful of fresh oregano
2 tablespoons olive oil
juice of 1/2 lemon
black olive mash (or plain mashed potatoes)

Preheat your oven to 475 degrees F. Score the skin of your fish with a knife so the marinade can penetrate. In a mortar and pestle smash up the garlic, add a teaspoon of salt, some pepper and the oregano. (This is fun even if your guests are about to walk in the door.) Pound this to a pulp and stir in the olive oil and lemon juice. Smear over your halibut. (Jamie advises it does not need to be swimming in the marindade.) Lay the fish on a clean baking tray, skin side up. Place in oven and roast about 7 minutes. Take care not to overcook.

If your kitchen is as hopelessly supplied as mine, you don't have a baking tray and you substitute an oven roasting pan and, if you're nervous, as I am, you put the lid on so the fish is not "nice and crispy" as Jamie says, but it isn't burned, either. It's tender and delicious.

Then you enjoy your friends and life seems quite normal despite the economic crisis and all the time you are holding the gifts of the Inheritance in your mind and wanting to share them.

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