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Julie Andrews feminist?

William Langley writes in The Telegraph -

It is the school-of-hard-knocks upbringing that presents the real mystery; how did Julie ever make the big time playing fragile heroines with vowels of silver and hearts of gold? Could it be – as some have suggested – that the real significance of her oeuvre lies elsewhere? Peter Kemp, a writer on cultural studies at the University of Melbourne, argues that both Poppins and The Sound of Music should be seen as profound feminist epics: "In each film," he says, "a singular woman descends upon a dysfunctional patriarchal world, and sets about changing that world. Mary Poppins turns the domestic universe of the Banks family completely upside down, functioning not so much in her appointed role as 'nanny' but more as a 'governess' in every sense of the word. She genuinely, totally, governs, dispensing directives of delight, issuing Zen‑like orders for living. . ."

Her roles did seem to have a knack for making children happy. I love the people - men and women in real life - who do that.

Comments (1)

Death Bredon:

Both Mary Popins and Maria Von Trapp are strong feminine characters that respectively persuade a father to behave as a good father ought, with partiarch love, not regimented discipline. This hardly seems feminist to me.

Nevertheless, I would concede, however, that Julie Andrews, the actress herself, is both a considerable feminine and feminist force! She is decidedly and deservedly amongst the best of British.

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