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'A puissant people superbly self-confident'

Almost finished moving. Really tired last night and very grateful for a bed. This is the way people feel who work hard physically. Every day.

I'm glad I don't. I respect those who do.

Back online, following a link at Maggie's Farm, I found Washington Rebel and a thought-provoking quote about liberty which I think connects with hard work. The quote -

March, 1603: A great literature had been evoked; an efflorescence of genius made a single reign as nearly immortal as the temporal can be timeless. Milton, a little later, would see England as an eagle flying proudly into the sun, a puissant people superbly self-confident. But the nation was not inwardly at peace. It had still to carry an unfinished religious and ecclesiastical reformation to some accepted issue within the framework of the English love of liberty, respect for authority, concern for established order, reverence for precedent, and militant tenacity of individual convictions and opinions. In a spacious way, the action and interaction of these essentially English qualities had made English history since Magna Carta and determined its splendid and stormy course, politically, socially, and religiously. (The History of American Congregationalism, by Gaius Atkins and Frederick Fagley.)

Washington Rebel writes:

'The English love of liberty, respect for authority, concern for established order, reverence for precedent, and militant tenacity of individual convictions and opinions' is not 'libertarianism', but Liberty. A mature liberty. You cannot have respect for authority, concern for order, or reverence for precedent if your sole contribution in this life is I Do as I Please'.

They reverenced their just laws and liberties. They were not libertines. They were superbly self-confident because they had gained some control over nature's forces through hard physical work and inventiveness. They were raising crops and animals, fishing, making scientific discoveries and exploring the world. They respected and learned from tradition - the experiences of those who had gone before them. They were working hard mentally and physically, and they were seeing results.

That made them even fiercer about preserving their mature and hard-won freedom. They were especially determined to protect their right to spiritual exploration. That was work, too, but like all good work, it filled them with energy.

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