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Terence Rattigan's 100th

Sir Terence Mervyn Rattigan CBE (10 June 1911 – 30 November 1977) was "one of England's most popular 20th century dramatists. . .an expert choreographer of emotion, and an anatomist of human emotional pain."

Celebrity came early with the play French without Tears. He lived luxuriously on the profits of a string of theatrical successes, including The Winslow Boy, The Browning Version, The Deep Blue Sea, and Separate Tables.

Then, after John Osborne's Look Back in Anger exploded on stage, Rattigan was suddenly pronounced old-fashioned and put out with the rubbish.

His work is experiencing a revival on the 100th anniversary of his birth.

His play on the last days of Lord Nelson, A Bequest to the Nation, has already been revived.

We said a few days ago that we were going to post about dumb dim things, hopefully without being too dim ourselves.

One of the dim things, in my opinion, is publishing the sexual preferences of artists who have tried to be discreet and private and have broken no laws. The modern fascination with this seems intrusive, excessive and pathetic.

The claim is made that we gain insights into an artist's work by knowing what he or she had wished to keep private. Really?

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