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Morte Point, North Devon - generous inheritance

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Looking south toward Morte Point, North Devon

We snapped the photo on an iPhone. The image doesn't do justice to the sea which was a many-coloured blue until viewed from green, sheep-grazed pastures inland when the Atlantic became a shining silver.

We climbed the steep coast path and eventually found ourselves in a fine pub where everyone who entered was accompanied by a dog. Well-behaved, as you will have guessed.

We passed through the gate to Morte Point so quickly we neglected to note the British family who gave the headland to all the people of Britain. There have been many such people. The country of Britain, so welcoming to walkers, hikers and dogs, bears witness to their generosity.

National Trust warden Jonathan Fairhurst writes in the Guardian: "This exhilarating walk along the South West Coast path brings you close to crashing waves on the rocks, fantastic views and abundant wildlife. It's good to do at any time of year – in the winter to experience the wildness of the area and the power of the sea (as long as you are wrapped up warm), while spring and summer are best for wildlife, from seeing grey seals basking in the sunshine to watching peregrine falcons swooping along the cliffs. The views are breathtaking wherever you are but there are also some beautiful quiet spots to discover, such as the secluded cove at Bennett's Mouth and Kinever Valley. My favourite part is the tip of Morte Point, looking both out towards the Morte Stone and beyond to Lundy Island, and inland to the fantastic rock formations in the shape of stegosaurus dinosaur armour plates standing on end." 


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