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Booking your next flight - UK Engineers Print and Fly the World's First Working 3-D Printed Aircraft

Listening to news reports about problems, of which there are many, we sometimes forget how much marvellous invention is going on.

Clay Dillow reports that engineers at the University of Southampton in the UK have designed, printed, and sent skyward the world’s first aircraft manufactured almost entirely via 3-D printing technology. The UAV--dubbed SULSA (Southampton University Laser Sintered Aircraft)--is powered by an electric motor that is pretty much the only part of the aircraft not created via additive manufacturing methods.

It’s no slouch of a UAV either. SULSA boasts a 6.5-foot wingspan, a top speed of about 100 miles per hour, and is nearly silent while cruising. Created on an EOS EOSINT P730 nylon laser sintering machine, its wings, hatches, control surfaces--basically everything that makes up its structure and aerodynamic controls--was custom printed to snap together. It requires no fasteners and no tools to assemble.

This, of course, is the dream of aircraft makers big and small. . .

Printing 3-D in the material of your choice. . .

Thanks to Instapundit for the link.

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