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'God,' cried Richard Dawkins

Richard Dawkins has been on the warpath against Christianity for some time. He has now released the results of a poll which suggest that Brits who identify themselves as Christian are not really Christian because they don't know Christian theology. For instance, they don't know the name of the first book of the New Testament. From his lofty intellectual eminence, Richard Dawkins can assure them that they are not really Christian.

This morning, on BBC 4 Dawkins discussed his 'findings' with an interviewer. The Reverend Giles Fraser, former Canon Chancellor of St Paul's, called Dawkins's assessment unfair and then asked him this question:

Reverend Fraser: But Richard, if I said to you what is the full title of The Origin of Species, I'm sure you could tell me that.

Dawkins: Yes, I could.

Fraser: Go on then.

Dawkins: On the Origin of Species, ah, with, ah, God, ah, On the Origin of Species, um, there is, there is a subtitle, um, with respect to the preservation of favoured species in the fight, in the struggle for life.

Fraser: You are the Pope of Darwinism. If you asked people who believed in evolution that question and you came back and said 2% got it right, it would be terribly easy for me to go they don't really believe it after all. . .

Delicious.

Comments (3)

So, er, what was the title of Darwin's book? Was it "The Voyage of the Beagle"?

jlh:

Wait! I have it! It's The Voyage of the Dawn Treader and Richard Dawkins is the fellow who realizes that his own mind is the greatest treasure of mankind, so he turns into a dragon to protect it.

-Ed.:

Another bit of deliciousness comes to mind that would also handle Dawkins and his kind. It was the great British theologians Conybeare and Howson who wrote of the apostle Paul's mindset toward a gaggle of unctuous Athenian intellectuals of the 1st century:

"The thoughts and feelings in the mind of the Christian Apostle, who came to Athens about the middle of that interval of time which separates the visit of Pausanias from that of Cicero, were very different from those of criticism or admiration. Paul burned with zeal for that God whom, 'as he went through the city,' he saw dishonored on every side. He was melted with pity for those who, notwithstanding their intellectual greatness, were 'wholly given to idolatry.' His eye was not blinded to the reality of things, by the appearances either of art or philosophy. Forms of earthly beauty and words of human wisdom were valueless in his judgement, and far worse than valueless, if they deified vice and made falsehood attractive."

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