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June gales

It has been a bit windblown and wet, but nothing unusual, I'm assured:.

In his journal for June 7 1787, Gilbert White of Selborne wrote of “ice thick as a crown piece. Potatoes much injured and whole rows of kidney‑beans killed.” The late, great Christopher Lloyd, in a Country Life column in June 1984, reported that the weather had been dismal ever since “that marvellous fortnight in late April”. And in the 1960s Margery Fish warned us of “gales that always turn up some time in June, to humble our pride and challenge our foresight”.

Happily, this post is being written in lovely June light.

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