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McKeever, Farah, Campbell - gold in the water, on the track, in the ring

Farah, McKeever, Campbell.

Mo Farah came from behind to win gold, this time in the 5,000 metres, with everyone in the Olympic stadium cheering him on in a storm of sound. His two golds, Mo said, were due to everyone who helped him. He ran his last mile in 4 minutes, in what seemed like a tribute to Sir Roger Bannister.

Earlier, on Eton Dorney, Ed McKeever, the 'Quiet Man', 'Bolt in a boat', won the first ever 200m kayak sprint. Imagine Ed, an accountant from Wiltshire, heading out in the solitude of dawn to practice with his slender kayak and double-blade paddle. Then he arrives at the Olympics, an amateur, and takes gold.

An hour after Farah's win, Britain’s Luke Campbell, 'Cool Hand Luke', won the gold medal in the men’s bantamweight - the first British gold at the weight for more than 100 years. Boxing is another sport whose rules of fair play were invented by a Brit, so you might be forgiven for thinking 'bout time. Given the physicality of the game, too much for some of us to enjoyably watch, rules of fair play are vital. Vital to life.

As the Olympics draw to a close, we hope that fair play, competition, and the pursuit of excellence will continue to illuminate life in 'the isles of wonder'.

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